Cambridge Healthtech Institute’s 5th Annual

Combination Immunotherapy

Targeting Immunotherapy Combinations for Increased Clinical Efficacy

11-12 March 2020

 

Treating patients with an immunotherapy combination has become commonplace for many cancers. With an abundance of combinations to choose from and plenty more clinical trials ongoing, it is difficult to know which combinations will be most effective. Whether double immunotherapy combinations or immune checkpoint inhibitors combined with conventional cancer therapy, there are numerous factors that may influence therapeutic success, with varying degrees of supporting evidence. Predictive biomarkers, neoantigens, therapeutic mechanism, reducing toxicity and the immune response are all important considerations. Join us for the 5th Annual Combination Immunotherapy conference and target immunotherapy combinations for increased clinical efficacy.

Final Agenda

WEDNESDAY 11 MARCH

PLENARY KEYNOTE SESSION

11:15 Organizer’s Remarks

Ngoc ‘Emily’ Le, PhD, Conference Producer, Cambridge Healthtech Institute

11:20 Chairperson’s Remarks

Andrew Sewell, PhD, Distinguished Research Professor and Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator, Infection & Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine

11:30 Strategies to Improve Antitumor Efficacy of Genetically Engineered T Cells

Stanley Riddell, MD, Scientific Director, Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Professor, University of Washington School of Medicine

Immune cells can be readily genetically modified to express natural tumor targeting antigen receptors or synthetic chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that activate immune cell signaling pathways to result in destruction of tumor cells expressing the relevant target molecule. The presentation will discuss advances in our understanding of receptor signaling and the development of strategies that combine therapeutic agents to improve efficacy and safely extend the spectrum of cancers that can be treated with cell therapies.

12:00 PD-1 Antibodies Are Transforming Cancer Treatment

Roy D. Baynes, MD, PhD, Senior Vice President and Head, Global Clinical Development, CMO, Merck Sharpe & Dohme

PD-1 antibodies have shown significant activity as monotherapy across multiple cancer types and lines of therapy. Precision medicine tools have been used to identify subjects most likely to respond to PD-1 antibody monotherapy, to provide insight to potential resistance mechanisms, and to inform combination therapies. A number of these combinations have demonstrated significant activity in additional tumor types and lines of therapy.

12:30 Enjoy Lunch on Your Own

COMBINATION IMMUNOTHERAPY OPENING session

13:30 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Jakob Dupont, MD, MA, CMO, Gossamer Bio


13:35 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Developing PD-1 Combinations

Gordon J. Freeman, PhD, Professor of Medicine, Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School

 

 

 

 

14:05 GB1275: A First-in-Class CD11b Modulator in the Clinic to Target Tumor Myeloid Suppressor Biology

Jakob Dupont, MD, MA, CMO, Gossamer Bio

Immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, such as antibodies targeting PD1 and PDL1, help a percentage of patients with cancer. However, tumors have a number of other mechanisms to escape immune surveillance. Myeloid suppressor cells (like MDSCs and TAMs) present in colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and triple negative breast cancers, are thought to be important to prevent checkpoint inhibitor activity. GB1275 is a first-in-class CD11b modulator in the clinic that targets myeloid suppressor cells. GB1275 is being studied in selective solid tumors as monotherapy, in combination with either checkpoint inhibitor or chemotherapy.

14:35 Sponsored Presentation (Opportunity Available)

15:05 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

NEXT-GENERATION COMBINATIONS

15:45 Combining Immunotherapy with DNA-Damage Repair Agents: Scientific and Clinical Rationale, Current Status, and Future Perspectives

Ivan Diaz Padilla, MD, PhD, Executive Medical Director, Global Clinical Development Lead; DNA-Damage Repair Program, Oncology Global Clinical Development, Ares Trading, S.A. [Merck Group]

The tumor DNA repair landscape has an important role in driving response to immune checkpoint blockade. Emerging experimental and clinical evidence suggests that features of genomic instability are associated with response to immune-directed therapies.

16:15 Immunotherapy with Avb6 Integrin Targeted CAR T Cells, Directed by CXCR2-Specific Chemokines

John Maher, MD, Consultant, Immunology, Kings College London

Avb6 integrin is aberrantly expressed in a broad range of solid tumours. This presentation will describe the iterative optimization of an Avb6-specific CAR, employing the CXCR2 chemokine receptor to enhance trafficking to IL-8 producing tumours and enhancing signalling potency using a parallel CAR platform technology.

16:45 The Role of Autologous Natural Killer Cells in Combination with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors and Antibodies in Cancer

Paul Song, MD, CMO, Translation Medicine, NKMax America

Natural killer cells play a big role in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) pathway and have also been identified as a key component in the responsiveness of tumors to checkpoint inhibitors. We discuss our proprietary natural killer cell technology and our preclinical and clinical experience in ADCC and immune checkpoint-based therapy.

17:15 Problem Solving Roundtable Discussions

18:15 Dinner Short Course Registration

18:45 Dinner Short Course


Recommended Short Course*

Dinner SC3: Engineering of Bispecific Antibodies and Multi-Specific Non-Antibody Scaffolds - LEARN MORE

Mathieu Cinier, PhD, Scientific Director, Affilogic

Mattias Levin, PhD, Senior Scientist, Antibody Engineering, Alligator Bioscience AB

THURSDAY 12 MARCH

8:00 Registration and Morning Coffee

ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-BASED COMBINATIONS

8:30 Chairperson’s Remarks

John Bell Ottawa, PhD, Senior Scientist, Innovative Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

8:35 Oncolytic Viruses: Multi-Faceted Therapeutics

John Bell Ottawa, PhD, Senior Scientist, Innovative Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

Oncolytic viruses are much more than tumour lysing therapeutics. They can be engineered to selectively deliver to the tumour microenvironment therapeutic payloads. Examples of how we have engineered a tumour selective vaccinia virus for use as replicating gene therapy vector will be presented.

9:05 Antibody-Drug Conjugate and Oncolytic Virus-Based IO Combinations: Different Modalities – Common Themes

Philipp Müller, PhD, Senior Principal Scientist, Cancer Immunology & Immune Modulation, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG

Despite the clinical breakthroughs achieved with checkpoint blockade, the overall proportion of patients experiencing durable responses remains relatively small. Therefore, the real promise for most cancer patients lies in complementary combination therapies, combining checkpoint blockade with the immune-promoting/supporting properties of other therapeutic modalities, which help breach physical barriers, overcome immunosuppression and improve immune cell infiltration in tumors. This talk will compare and highlight two of the latter categoies: Antibody-drug conjugates and oncolytic viruses.

9:35 Sponsored Presentation (Opportunity Available)

10:05 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

10:15 Speed Networking in the Exhibit Hall

TARGETING THE TUMOUR MICROENVIRONMENT

10:45 Chairperson’s Remarks

Tina J. Hieken, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Mayo Clinic

10:50 Determining the Selection of Combinatorial Therapies in Immune Oncology

Franco Marincola, MD, CSO, Refuge Biotechnologies

Anti-cancer immunotherapy is dependent upon a pre-existent dialogue between cancer and immune cells in “immune infiltrated” tumors. In “immune silent” and “immune-excluded” tumors, this dialogue does not occur. Analysis of the tumor microenvironment can dissect the biology underlying cancer immune responsiveness understanding mechanisms of action of therapeutics and documenting strategies adopted by tumor cells to escape immune recognition. This presentation discusses the current understanding of the determinism of cancer resistance.

11:20 Neoadjuvant Immunotherapy for Melanoma

Tina J. Hieken, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Mayo Clinic

With efficacious new systemic therapies for advanced melanoma and new approvals for adjuvant treatment of resected high-risk stage III melanoma, the next logical step is exploring systemic therapy prior to surgical treatment for resectable high-risk disease. Data from pilot clinical trials suggests that neoadjuvant immunotherapy might be a better approach to augment immunity than adjuvant therapy and that combinatorial regimens might enhance treatment response and improve patient outcomes, but these approaches remain largely untested. In parallel, systematic study of drivers of response and toxicity are an active area of investigation.

11:50 Developing Personalized Neoantigen Cancer Vaccines to Target Solid Tumors

Karoline Schjetne, PhD, Vice President Scientific Affairs, Vaccibody

Vaccibody is a clinical-stage biotech company dedicated to the discovery and development of novel immunotherapies. Vaccibody is a leader in the rapidly developing field of individualized cancer neoantigen vaccines and is using the Vaccibody technology to generate best-in-class therapeutics to treat cancers with a high unmet medical need. The talk will focus on preclinical data underlining the superior vaccine technology and present clinical updates on the Phase I/IIa VB10.NEO vaccine trial VB N-01.

12:20 Networking Lunch in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

BISPECIFIC ANTIBODY AND CHECKPOINT INHIBITOR COMBINATIONS

13:05 Chairperson’s Remarks

Dimitris Skokos, PhD, Director, Immunity & Inflammation, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

13:10 A Novel Class of Fully Human Co-Stimulatory Bispecific Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

Dimitris Skokos, PhD, Director, Immunity & Inflammation, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

T cell activation is initiated upon binding of the T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex to peptide-MHC complexes (“signal 1”); activation is then enhanced by engagement of a second “co-stimulatory” receptor, such as the CD28 receptor on T cells binding to its cognate ligand(s) on the target cell (“signal 2”). Recently described CD3-based “bispecific antibodies” act by replacing conventional signal 1, linking T cells to tumor cells by binding a tumor-specific antigen (TSA) with one arm of the bispecific, and bridging to TCR/CD3 with the other.

13:40 CB213: A Trispecific Dual Checkpoint Inhibitor Optimally Configured for Therapeutic Efficacy

James Legg, PhD, Senior Vice President, Research, Crescendo Biologics

CB213 is a tetravalent trispecific molecule generated using fully human VH domains (Humabody VH). The talk will describe the identification and characterisation of CB213 which delivers dual checkpoint blockade through inhibition of PD-1 and Lag3. Data will be presented showing that this molecule is able to reverse the dysfunctional phenotype of patient derived human T cells which are non-responsive to clinical PD-1 antibodies.

14:10 Ator-1015 – From Discovery to the Clinic

Anne Mansson-Kvarnhammar, PhD, Senior Scientist, Alligator Bioscience AB

ATOR-1015 is a tumor-directed CTLA-4 x OX40 bispecific antibody designed to improve the efficacy and safety of current CTLA-4 targeting therapies. This talk will cover preclinical in vitro and in vivo data and give an overview of the ongoing Phase I study and the clinical development path.

14:40 Managing T Cell Activation and Macrophage Differentiation with a Dual Player Nanofitin to Treat Cancer

Mathieu Cinier, PhD, Scientific Director, Affilogic

Success of immune checkpoint inhibitors highly depends of the number of T cell infiltrates as well as other factors such as inflammatory markers (e.g. Macrophage differentiation). We demonstrated the efficacy of a combination targeting several immunology pathways to treat cancer.

15:10 Close of Summit

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